Center for Emergent Materials: an NSF MRSEC

The Center for Emergent Materials engages researchers from multiple disciplines to work in teams on scientific problems too complex for a single researcher to solve. The CEM, established in 2008, is located at The Ohio State University and funded by a National Science Foundation MRSEC award.


 FEATURED News

July 20, 2016

We are pleased to announce that after a thorough internal and external review process, 11 awards have been made to fund exceptionally promising, innovative materials research on campus through the 2016 OSU Materials Research Seed Grant Program. Congratulations to CEM’s own, Professors Hammel, Myers, and Woodward. The awards total $500,000 in internal research funding to 25 Ohio State researchers from 10 departments in five colleges.

Read the full announcement here.


FEATURED Recognition

President Obama Honors Extraordinary Early-Career Scientists including CEM Participant Sayeef Salahuddin

March 34, 2016

President Obama named 105 researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. The winners will receive their awards at a Washington, DC ceremony this spring. The awards, established by President Clinton in 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach.

Dr. Sayeef Salahuddin joined the faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley in 2008. His research interests are in the interdisciplinary field of electronic transport in nanostructures currently focusing on novel electronic and spintronic devices for low power logic and memory applications.