Prof. Robert Baker Named Deputy Director of the Institute for Optical Science

Congratulations to Prof. Robert Baker on his appointment as Deputy Director of the Institute of Optical Science.

Robert has been a member of iOS since its inception in 2018 and is co-Director of the NSF NeXUS facility. Robert’s research interest utilizes ultrafast optical-XUV spectroscopy to study surface electron dynamics and interfacial charge transfer in order to control catalytic energy conversion processes.>

Robert joined the faculty at OSU in 2014. He received his B.S. from Brigham Young University. In 2012, he completed his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in the group of Prof. Gabor Somorjai. He remained at Berkeley as a post-doctoral research associate in the group of Prof. Stephen Leone. At OSU, he has been awarded funding from the NSF, DOE and AFOSR. His distinctions include a DOE Early Career award an AFOSR Young Investigator award and the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar award.

Visit the iOS website for webinar schedules and news items.

Stiner-Jones Completes ELATES Program

Congratulations to La’Tonia Stiner-Jones for completing the “Executive Leadership in Academic Technology Engineering and Sciences” program. The program is designed to prepare women faculty for executive leadership roles. The 11-month program includes a number of assignments, readings, and group projects. All participants were required to complete an Institutional Action Project of benefit to their college, department, and/or the university.

Ohio State Recognized as Midwestern Hub of Next-Gen Magnetic Resonance Research

Ohio State: Midwestern Hub of Next-Gen Magnetic Resonance Research | Electrical and Computer Engineering

September 13, 2016

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Magnetic resonance is one of the most important phenomena in materials and medical research. Its broad range of applications has revolutionized modern technologies, from wireless communication to radar, while saving millions of lives in the medical realms through the early detection of disease.

A team of physicists and engineers at The Ohio State University has now won a $1.071 million award from the National Science Foundation’s Major Research Instrumentation program (NSF-MRI) to help advance the study of magnetic resonance technology at the nanoscale level. Over the next three years, they will work to develop and build new equipment capable of discovering novel magnetic resonance phenomena at a very high frequency range up to 330 Ghz. The Institute for Materials Research (IMR) at Ohio State coordinated the group effort that ultimately led to the winning NSF-MRI award.

Department of Physics Professor and IMR Associate Director Fengyuan Yang, Principal Investigator (PI) on the project, said the technology they are developing could make Ohio State a center for high-frequency magnetic resonance research across the Midwest. Once constructed, the new instrument will be located inside the university’s NanoSystems Laboratory, a facility open to all academic and industrial users.

“This will be the first magnetic resonance spectrometer within this frequency range at a shared user facility in the Midwest,” Yang said, “and it will significantly strengthen and expand the investigation of novel fundamental phenomena and the development of paradigm-changing technologies for researchers at Ohio State and from across the region.”

The NSF-MRI project team includes Yang, with co-investigators P. Chris Hammel, professor of Physics; John Volakis, professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); Joseph Heremans, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Physics; Rolando Valdes Aguilar, assistant professor of Physics; Zeke Johnston-Halperin, associate professor of Physics; and Denis Pelekhov, director of the NanoSystems Laboratory.

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